Declawing cats? Banned. Dogs? Saved. Horses? Found. Hippo? For Christmas.

Animals rule.

Well, you probably already knew that but this week, they also ruled on social media.

Here’s how.

Nova Scotia becomes first province to ban declawing of domestic cats

The Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association has amended its code of ethics to make the practice of elective and non-therapeutic declawing ethically unacceptable.

The Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association has amended its code of ethics to make the practice of elective and non-therapeutic declawing ethically unacceptable.

File/ Global News

“It’s a great day. I’m so proud of the Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association,” said a retired veterinarian who has been pushing for the change.

Nova Scotia became the first province to ban medically-unnecessary cat declawing, part of a worldwide movement against the practice.

The story garnered more than 46,000 likes, comments and shares.

Here’s how some of you reacted to the news.

Dogs rescued from South Korean meat farm to be put up for adoption in Canada

Fifty dogs rescued from a dog meat farm in South Korea arrived in Canada this week, according to an animal welfare group.

Humane Society International’s Canadian branch said the canines are bound for shelters and rescue groups in Ontario and Quebec.

This story hit home, literally, and more than 33,000 people engaged with the posts online.

People were divided in their reactions.

6 horses stolen from central Alberta ranch found safe

Six horses were stolen from an Alberta ranch last week.

The search for the horses spread across Canada and now, the Alberta family’s pleas have been answered: the horses are home.

The Cameron family riding some of the horses which were stolen from their central Alberta ranch near Winfield, Alta. last week.

The Cameron family riding some of the horses which were stolen from their central Alberta ranch near Winfield, Alta. last week.

Supplied

A man working at an area gas plant called, saying he saw what looked like the family’s horses.

“As soon as I pulled in I knew it was them and I was just crying and shaking at the same time. I was overwhelmed with joy. It was so nice to see them,” said 17-year-old Cornelia Cameron.

Cameron is grateful for all the people who shared their story.

The combined stories (the original report of the horses going missing, and the follow-up when they were found) got more than 63,000 interactions in total.

“I appreciate it; I don’t think we could have done this without everybody. And it’s amazing to see how, not just our rural community, as a province everybody came together.”

A ‘Christmas miracle’ dog is heading home

An Alberta dog who had been missing for five months turned up in B.C. last month. He’s now hitching a ride home for the holidays.

You could call it a Christmas miracle.

But how did Frankie end up in B.C. in the first place?

“I suspect he probably hitched a ride with his charming personality and good looks,” said Langley Animal Protection Society executive director Jane Nelson.

‘I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas’ singer finally gets her hippo – 60 years later

A pygmy hippopotamus is different than the common hippo in several ways, the San Diego Zoo says.

A pygmy hippopotamus is different than the common hippo in several ways, the San Diego Zoo says.

Michael Fairchild/Getty Images

Ten-year-old Gayla Peevey sang the novelty hit, I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas in 1953.

That same year, a statewide fund drive helped bring a Nile hippo, which Peevy helped receive, on Christmas Eve. It was then donated to the Oklahoma City Zoo.

Now, more than 60 years after the song first debuted, Peevey, an Oklahoma City native, has welcomed another hippopotamus to the city’s zoo.

Here’s a very Canadian comment about this:

— With files from Karen Bartko, Simon Little, Dani-Elle Dubé, The Canadian Press 

eric.do@globalnews.ca

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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